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Monument to Tito Unveiled in Podgorica

Radio Slobodna Europa today reports that a memorial to Tito was unveiled in Podgorica.

6 Things Serbs Say Why Yugoslavia Was Better

“6 predanja svakog jugonostalgičara,” Telegraf, 11/29/2018 [pdf]

Remembering 29 November, Dan Republike (Day of the Republic)

It is no coincidence I launched Remembering Yugoslavia on November 29 (2017).

Europe in Sepia

Dubravka Ugresić. Europe in Sepia. Translated from the Croatian by David Williams. Rochester, NY: Open Letter, 2014

Karaoke Culture

Dubravka Ugresic: Karaoke Culture. Rochester: Open Letter, 2011

Twilight of the Idols

Aleš Debeljak. Twilight of the Idols: Recollections of a Lost Yugoslavia. Translated from the Slovenian by Michael Biggins. Buffalo, NY: White Pine Press, 1995

Miss Ex-Yugoslavia: A Memoir

Stefanovic, Sofija. Miss Ex-Yugoslavia: A Memoir. New York: Simon and Schuster, 2018.

“Guide to Yugonostalgia”

Svjetlana Rašić, “Vodič kroz jugonostalgiju: Da li je 25.maj u modi?” (Guide to Yugonostalgia: Is May 25 in Fashion?), Esquire Serbia, 5/26/2017

Remembering 25 May, Dan Mladosti (Day of Youth)

Dan Mladosti was one of the biggest holidays in SFRY and it continues to be commemorated today.

Gallup Poll Finds Mixed Perceptions About Yugoslavia’s Breakup

A Gallup poll released a year ago, on May 18, 2017 shows that perceptions regarding Yugoslavia’s breakup vary by former republic, by ethnicity, and by age.

The Cultural Life of Capitalism in Yugoslavia

Jelača, Dijana, Maša Kolanović, and Danijela Lugarić, eds. The Cultural Life of Capitalism in Yugoslavia: (Post)Socialism and Its Other. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave MacMillan, 2017.

In Praise of Forgetting

Rieff, David. In Praise of Forgetting: Historical Memory and Its Ironies. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2016.

The Collective Memory Reader

Olick, Jeffrey, Vered Vinitzky-Seroussi, and Daniel Levy, eds. The Collective Memory Reader. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Travels with Herodotus

Kapuscinski, Ryszard. Travels with Herodotus. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2007.

The Ministry of Pain

Ugrešić, Dubravka. The Ministry of Pain. Translated by Michael Henry Helm. New York: HarperCollins, 2005.

“Aquellos que no pueden recordar el pasado…”

Aquellos que no pueden recordar el pasado están condenados a repetirlo. (Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it.)

Nostalgia: Origins and Ends of an Unenlightened Disease

Illsbruck, Helmut. Nostalgia: Origins and Ends of an Unenlightened Disease. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press, 2012.

Remembering Utopia

Luthar, Breda, and Maruša Pušnik, eds. Remembering Utopia: The Culture of Everyday Life in Socialist Yugoslavia. Washington, DC: New Academia Publishing, 2010.

The Spirit of Mourning

Connerton, Paul. The Spirit of Mourning: History, Memory and the Body. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Past for the Eyes

Sarkisova, Oksana, and Péter Apor. Past for the Eyes: East European Representations of Communism in Cinema and Museums after 1989. Budapest: Central European University Press, 2008

Balkan Idols

Perica, Vjekoslav. Balkan Idols: Religion and Nationalism in Yugoslav States. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.

The Past Within Us

Morris-Suzuki, Tessa. The Past Within Us: Media, Memory, History. London: Verso, 2005.

“It will end in a fog…”

I think that the picture of Yugoslavia, of the life in it, and what kind of country it was will be less and less clear as more and more time passes since its breakup.

On Longing

Stewart, Susan. On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1993.

“The past is never dead…”

The past is never dead. It’s not even past.

The Kitschification of Communist Material Culture

Fischer, Lisa Pope. Symbolic Traces of Communist Legacy in Post-Communist Hungary: Experiences of a Generation that Lived During the Socialist Era. Leiden: Brill, 2016.

Notes on Užice

[This is a running post, updated with new notes as needed.]

Notes on Kragujevac

[This is a running post, updated with new notes as needed.]

Notes on Jajce

[This is a running post, updated with new notes as needed.]

“The struggle of man…”

The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting.

The Yugoslav Drama

Crnobrnja, Mihailo. The Yugoslav Drama. 2nd edition. Montreal: McGill-Queen’s University Press, 1994.

Yugoslavia Dismembered

Samary, Catherine. Yugoslavia Dismembered. Translated from the French by Peter Drucker. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1995.

Tito in Street Names Across Former Yugoslav Republics

The Italian researcher Giorgio Comai has created a map of streets and squares across the former Yugoslavia bearing Tito’s name.

Post-Communist Nostalgia

Todorova, Maria, and Zsuzsa Gille, eds. Post-Communist Nostalgia. New York: Berghahn Books, 2010.

“The thing I miss about communism…”

I was about 18 when these Changes happened. I studied hard in school and did all the things I was supposed to do. But it was for nothing.

Post-communist nostalgia as a special memory case

Todorova, Maria. “Daring to remember Bulgaria, pre-1989.” The Guardian, 9 November 2009.

Remembrance of Things Past

Proust, Michael. Swann’s Way: In Search of Lost Time, Volume 1. 1913.

“There is no greater sorrow…”

In the tragedy Medea (431 BC), Euripides describes the protagonist’s feeling about her exile.

How and what different generations remember

As I reviewed media coverage of Republic Day in Yugoslavia’s successor countries, I saw parallels with Slovakia in how different generations remember the former country.

A Politics of Sorrow

Ljubisic, Davorka. A Politics of Sorrow: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia. Montreal: Black Rose Books, 2004

“When I lost my country…”

In Tristia (“Sorrows,” approx. 8-17 AD), the poet Ovid laments his life in exile from Rome (the exile itself may or may not have actually happened). One of the verses describes the pain of losing his country.

Welcome to Remembering Yugoslavia

Remembering Yugoslavia: Memories of a Disappeared Country explores how citizens of Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, and Kosovo remember the former Yugoslavia.

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